Explaining the Rapture

the rapture

In Biblical terms, the Rapture is akin to Armageddon in many ways. Although there are many different views about this event inside of the Christian community, the gist of it always remains the same.

It is when Jesus returns and grants passage to those who have served him loyally. For those who have not and who do not believe nor accept him into their hearts, they will be left earthbound to face the terrible times ahead.

What is the Rapture?

This is a very controversial subject amongst the Christian community. If you do not believe in Jesus and do not subscribe to religion, then the story obviously doesn’t concern you in the same way. But for those who do believe, this event isn’t a question of how or why, but rather a question of when.

There are no Biblical references to the “rapture” at all, which makes it all the more controversial. Instead, within the New Testament, there is a Greek word that roughly translated to “caught up,” and this was ultimately translated to “rapiemur,” which, of course, translate to “rapture” in English. The context was that of Jesus returning to Earth to claim his bride, the Church. Other instances in the Bible—verses from Acts, Corinthians, Thessalonians, and Revelations—all point to Jesus returning and opening the door which serves as passage to heaven.

In plain English: Jesus returns, wakes the dead, calls his followers to heaven, and everyone else is left behind.

Surviving the Rapture

If you’re not a morally upright believer in Christ, assuming an event like this took place, what would you do to survive it?
raptureThe Rapture isn’t an “end of days” scenario like so many other doomsday prophecies. Instead, the dead shall rise and be taken to heaven, followed by those alive who believe. For the rest of the world’s population, you can expect widespread panic the likes of which you couldn’t even imagine. You would see an instantaneous breaking down of social services and society in general. Planes, trains, buses, restaurants, public utilities, and even that local neighborhood bodega – nothing would be operational. (Hypothetically speaking, of course.)

If you relied on a public water supply, it would be shut off. If you relied on public electricity, it would be gone. There would be no one manning gas stations. You wouldn’t be able to find any police around to keep the peace.

Why? Well, roughly a quarter of the world’s population believes in Christ. In western cultures, like the United States, Canada, Mexico, the UK, and some other European and Central and South American locations, we’re talking about roughly 80% of all people being either carried away to heaven or lost and damned because they were left behind. Needless to say, no one’s showing up for work the next day; the entire world would be left in a state of utter shock.
Forget the earthquakes and floods and nuclear winter scenarios, this is the mother of all doomsday scenarios. This is over a billion people missing. This is everyone else left realizing that they’re damned to hell and are being left to rot on Earth. You would see no civil order; only widespread lunacy.

Some predict that December 21, 2012 is a date for the Rapture; however, this event has been predicted for decades. It seems like every year someone is sure Jesus is returning.

The odds of it happening, even assuming it is true, are incredibly slim. However, the Rapture, like with other disasters, is something that everyone should be ready for. This means having your survival means and methods in place should disaster ever strike
It might sound silly, but so do a lot of disasters before they actually happen.

One Response to Explaining the Rapture

  1. Albina says:

    thanks a lot for taking time to discuss this subject with us.

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